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MF GALAXY

MF GALAXY is a weekly podcast powered by four mighty engines: * Writers on writing: the craft and the business * Pop culture including TV, movies, graphic novels, and more * Progressive politics, activism, and social enterprise * Africentric change-makers, histories, cultures, art, and more! Mixing brand-new interviews with classic conversations (from my archive of 23 years in broadcasting) with famous and dynamic figures in the arts, Hollywood, and politics, MF GALAXY will take you to places you've never been before, and deliver fresh insights on the places you've been.
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Now displaying: Category: writer - playwright - first nations
Apr 18, 2016

Kenneth T. Williams is one of Canada’s most accomplished playwrights. His work ranges from the grim to the hilarious, and is endlessly provocative. His many plays, several of which have been published, include Café Daughter, Gordon Winter, Bannock Republic, and Suicide Notes, and celebrated actors such as Lorne Cardinal and Tantoo Cardinal have appeared in his plays Thunderstick and Three Little Birds, respectively.

Williams has been the playwright-in-residence for the Drama Department at the University of Saskatchewan, where he also teaches playwriting. He splits his time between Edmonton and Saskatoon. Williams hails from the George Gordon First Nation in Saskatchewan, and is the first Indigenous person to earn an M.F.A. in playwriting from the University of Alberta.

In today’s episode of MF GALAXY, Williams discusses:

  • The vital importance of curiosity for writers
  • Why character motivation and action is indispensable
  • What he means by the need to “eliminate Red Shirts” and why “everyone must drive the Death Star”
  • Why he disputes a star of Canadian Literature who denounces humour in writing
  • How he knew he was ready to teach playwriting
  • The indispensability of workshopping
  • What it means to be a text-based character-driven playwright, and
  • Why a script must be able to adapt to any stage

Williams spoke to me by Skype in November, 2014 from his office at the University of Saskatchewan.

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