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MF GALAXY

MF GALAXY is a weekly podcast powered by four mighty engines: * Writers on writing: the craft and the business * Pop culture including TV, movies, graphic novels, and more * Progressive politics, activism, and social enterprise * Africentric change-makers, histories, cultures, art, and more! Mixing brand-new interviews with classic conversations (from my archive of 23 years in broadcasting) with famous and dynamic figures in the arts, Hollywood, and politics, MF GALAXY will take you to places you've never been before, and deliver fresh insights on the places you've been.
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Now displaying: Page 1
Jun 13, 2018

There is an infinite number of ways not to have a successful writing career, but not that many ways to have one. You can write your own original novels and if you’re in the luckiest one percent, you’ll find editors who understand and love what you’re doing, and who work with publicists who know how to promote your work with opinion-leaders who’ll also love your work. Your publisher will work with distributors who’ll get your books into the bookstores where staff hand-sell your work. If you’re less lucky, you’ll end up like 98 percent of writers, whose books get a sliver of shelf-space for three months and die in the discount bin or get pulped.

But there’s another lucky one percent. And when I say lucky, I don’t mean they’re not hard-working, because as you’re about to hear from today’s guest, hard-working in this case could mean writing six books in one year, and one book in eleven days. And by lucky, I also don’t mean devoid of skill and artistry, because today’s guest has won numerous awards proving he has the respect of fans and his peers.

No, by lucky, I mean getting asked to enter the world of writing other people’s characters from movies, comics, or video games in new novels, or existing comics, video games, or table top games. Insiders call it licensed writing; some refer to IPs or intellectual property. For decades fans simply called these works tie-ins. And today’s guest is a master of them.

I met Alex Irvine at San Diego Comic Con 2004 when Del Rey was launching my first novel, The Coyote Kings of the Space-Age Bachelor Pad, and his new book One King, One Soldier had just come out. We hit it off right away. Irvine has worked as a reporter at the Portland Phoenix and as an English professor at the Universities of Denver and Maine.

But he’s written far, far more than I have. If you include trade-paperback collected editions and all his original and tie-in books, he’s released more than thirty. He’s written novels based on Batman, Transformers, Pacific Rim, Supernatural, Tin Tin, Dungeons and Dragons, and Isaac Asimov’s I, Robot, and has written comics for Marvel featuring Iron Man, Damien Hellstrom, and Daredevil. He’s written Alternate Reality Games including The Beast and I Love Bees, and the Facebook game Marvel: Avengers Alliance. His original novels include One King, One Soldier, The Narrows, and the Locus and Crawford-winning A Scattering of Jades.

Alex Irvine spoke with me by web video on May 25, 2018 from his home in Maine. We discussed: 

  • How and why he got started in the tie-in business, and why he’s stayed in it so long
  • The rewards of writing in so many different fields
  • Why he wishes he could write more slowly
  • The surprising flexibility of some tie-in publishers and a major Hollywood director, and the predictable rigidity of one, and
  • What you need to request in order to avoid getting exploited by publishers

 

AlexIrvine.blogspot.ca

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Jun 4, 2018

One of my favourite new TV series is the re-imagining of Lost in Space. It’s a great family show with rich characters and relationships, exciting adventures, and amazing depictions of future science discoveries. Plus, it’s got a great spaceship and a mysterious hulking robot. I’m hooked!

So imagine my delight when I’m watching the show and there onscreen is a friend from my old days at CJSR FM-88.5 campus-community radio at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. It’s Veenu Sandhu!

I’d always thought Sandhu was from Edmonton, but it turns out she’s from Dawson Creek, British Columbia. I also had no idea until recently that she’s a longtime fan-girl herself who knows more about Star Trek: Voyager than anyone I’ve ever met. She’s been on the superhero show Arrow, the science-fantasy series Fringe, the ABC dramas Somewhere Between and The Whispers, and in the movies Cop and a Half: New Recruit with Lou Diamond Phillips, and A Dog’s Way Home.

And now on Netflix’s Lost in Space, she plays astronaut Prisha Dhar, mother of young astronaut Vijay and wife of astronaut leader Victor. Once I saw Sandhu on Lost in Space, I knew I’d have to have her on the show. So on May 2, 2018 she spoke with me from her Vancouver home by internet video. We discussed:

  • The hustle and grind of being a working actor
  • Getting hired on Arrow and Fringe
  • The attitude and effort required to make it in the Vancouver film and television sector
  • And how close working on Lost in Space came to being her dream job

Veenu Sandhu also runs workshops for actors seeking to beat audition anxiety. Her next one is in Vancouver on June 13, 2018. The cost is $50. To register, email actorveenu@gmail.com.

 

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May 28, 2018

All humans face fear and sadness at times, especially when facing the stresses that are common to the human experience: potential job loss, alienation, illness, the death of loved ones, and more. But for some people, fear and sadness are present most or all of them time, and their power is overwhelming. Just five years ago, 3 million Canadians or almost twelve percent of us reported having a mood or anxiety disorder. About the same number will experience diagnosable depression at some point.

And yet for many, the stigma of mental illness is so strong that they can’t even use the phrase. They’ll say, “mental health issues” or “mental health challenges.” Among many new Canadian communities, the shame may be even greater, resulting in denial being number one coping strategy. But denial is no cure, and often makes people worse.

To discuss such problems and the strategies to help them, I recently spoke with Edmonton financial adviser, speaker, and author Odion Welch. She’s the author of Breakthrough: A Courageous True Story of Overcoming Depression and Anxiety. Each chapter of the book addresses a specific mental illness stressor such as familial and romantic relationships, careers, body image, and grief. We met at the Simply Done café in Edmonton’s gallery district on May 4, 2018. We discussed:

  • The real reasons that people abuse alcohol and drugs
  • How to counter the constant terror of making mountains out of molecules
  • The various causes of depression, especially among immigrant families, and why immigrant parents need to let their children discover and even fail
  • Therapies that work for some and not others
  • The psychological importance of being touched, and the many reasons so many people are starved for physical contact

OdionWelch.com

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May 7, 2018

Humanity needs books. I don’t mean that everybody loves reading, because clearly that’s not true. But it is true that many of us do love books, not only for the remarkable ideas they make us consider, but for how they lift our morale above the mundanity and the cruelty of the world, and inspire our souls and our intellects to transform our societies for the better.

No genre is more devoted to such inspiration and transformation than science fiction. And that’s why the refusal of the science fiction publishing industry, for generations, to offer a racial, cultural, and gender palette that reflects the true range of humanity has been so galling. It has deprived the majority of the human race the comfort and provocation we seek, and deprived our species of the ingenuity that we would have unleashed had we been so inspired.

Fortunately, the last two decades in particular have seen the beginning of a change, with the rise of African writers winning major sales and the top prizes for science fiction and fantasy writing, and the emergence of my guest’s company, the multiracial SFF publishing house Rosarium.

Based in Washington DC, Rosarium publishes novels, graphic novels, and comics, beginning with the seminal anthology Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond. The house’s writers include Pan Morigan, Nisi Shawl, Sheree Renee Thomas, Maurice Broaddus, Damian Duffy, Jaymee Goh, Ed Hall, and John Jennings, among many others. If you check the MF GALAXY archive, you’ll hear my conversation with one of one of Rosarium’s authors, Eileen Kaur Alden, the writer of the Super Sikh comic.

Bill Campbell spoke with me online on March 03, 2018. We discussed:

  • How he fell in love with SFF
  • The significance of authors Samuel Delaney and Octavia Butler to his work and life
  • The racist obstacles he faced as a novelist from publishing industry gatekeepers who told him his work wasn’t “ghetto” enough
  • How he founded Rosarium Publishing
  • Why it’s so difficult to racially integrate the shelves of comic book stores, and
  • How the gigantic success of the Black Panther movie will affect Africentric science fiction and fantasy publishing

Along the way, Campbell mentions “POD,” meaning “print-on-demand,” a system in which writers can get single copies of their books made for as little as a few dollars each, rather than having to pay to print, ship, and store hundreds of books at a time. Campbell also discusses his anthology Mothership and co-editor Ed Hall. In full disclosure, one of my stories is in that anthology.

Rosarium Publishing

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Apr 30, 2018

Whether you hear this podcast the day it went live—April 30, 2018—or any other day, you’ll have some mass-shooting in the United States that makes this discussion timely. According to AOL.com, in 2017 the United States endured 345 mass shootings. The Atlantic reported in 2016 that the US, with less than five percent of the world’s population, holds 35 – 40 percent of the world’s guns. The Gun Violence Archive reports that in 2017, Americans used guns to kill 15,000 Americans; more than 3000 of them were teens; police shot or killed more than 2000; and more than 2000 shootings were unintentional.

According to stereotypes, US Republicans love guns and US Democrats hate them, and since African-Americans are overwhelmingly Democrats, according to the transitive principle, most African-Americans must hate guns, too, right? After all, a lethal triad of street criminals, police criminals, and Whitesupremacist criminals use guns to terrorise African-Americans.

But it’s not that simple, as history demonstrates, and as my guest today will show.

Chad Glover is a writer and software developer from Philadelphia. According to his bio, he “grew up in a household where guns were commonplace,” but he “didn’t explore firearms as a skill and legacy until he moved to Stone Mountain Georgia,” which he calls “the spiritual home of the KKK.” That led him to write “about the forgotten ways that firearm ownership shaped the struggle for African liberation,” a tradition that includes the Deacons for Defense and the Black Panther Party. He describes himself as “a liberal gun owner,” and an active part of a continually-growing African-American gun community. You can find his essays on his African gun ownership at his blog, Daddys-gun.com.

Chad Glover spoke with me by digital video on March 23, 2018, from his home in Atlanta. We discussed:

  • The understandable motivations for gun control advocacy, but what those motives ignore
  • How Euro-American massacres against African-American communities demonstrate the importance of African gun ownership
  • The effective response to racist so-called open-carry marchers
  • Why the Trojan Horse gun control strategy of getting African- and Muslim-Americans to join NRA will not work, and
  • What the discussion of gun control would need to include for him to take the movement seriously

 

Apr 25, 2018

Hip hop began almost 50 years ago, and it’s changed more and encompassed more than any musical or lyrical aesthetic in that time that I can think of. Careers rise and fall, styles change and grow, but one thing remains the same: a great voice, clear delivery, a range of subjects, and intelligent insight as a package will almost guarantee immortality.

For years I hosted a radio show called Asiko Phantom Pyramid: Global African Musics Led by Headcharge of Hip Hop, and when it came to hip hop acts I’d play again and again, the list always include Public Enemy, KRS-One, Paris, and my guest today, the Boston-based rapper Akrobatik, and his partnership with the superb Mr. Lif in the crew called The Perceptionists. Akrobatik grabbed my imagination with 2003’s Balance, his first album, and proved he was no flash-in-the-pan with the 2005 Perceptionists album Black Dialogue. His music has appeared on HBO’s The Wire, in films such as Date Movie, and in video games such as Need for Speed: Most Wanted.

As a result of a ruptured heart valve, Akrobatik has also transformed himself physically, determined as he is to stay alive for his family, and to offer his gifts to the world. Those gifts include albums such as Absolute Value, Built to Last, and Resolution.

Akrobatik spoke with me by Skype on April 10, 2018 from his home in Boston. We discussed:

  • The influence on his life of his favourite teacher
  • The discipline required to keep creating entertaining and insightful lyrics
  • Whose hip hop skills and careers he would like emulate
  • How he came to teach at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, and how he balances that with his music career
Apr 16, 2018

For ages, inside and outside fan circles, the stereotype was that Africans and Indigenous people don’t like science fiction. That’s a bizarre myth. After all, because both science fiction and fantasy offer the spirit and the intellect the chance to remake the world. For peoples who remember the historical destruction of their own worlds and live under oppression, escape stories offer indispensable hope—the dream that deliverance is possible. And when they offer the intellect the means to plan utopia, or at least a new-topia, they’re even more powerful.

That yearning helps explain the extraordinary success of Black Panther, and the promise offered by award-winning science fiction filmmakers such as my guest today, Danis Goulet. She’s a Cree-Metis filmmaker from LaRonge, Saskatchewan. She’s an alumna of the National Screen Institute's Drama Prize Program in Canada and the TIFF Talent lab. Her social realist and science fiction films and virtual reality work have gone to the Toronto International Film Festival, Sundance, and imagineNATIVE. Her VR includes The Hunt, and her films include the dramas Barefoot and Wapawekka, and the post-apocalyptic Wakening. That stunning 2013 short film imagines a future Toronto crushed under an unknown hypertechnological occupation. And engaging their ancient conflict at doomsday are two titans of Cree mythology: Weesagichak, the genderless shapeshifter from the stars, and Weetigo, the ruthless cannibal spirit of insatiable hunger.

On March 15, 2018, Danis Goulet spoke with me by Skype from her home in Toronto. We discussed: 

  • Her early history as a fan girl and a young filmmaker
  • Her move into art house cinema and then into global Indigenous film
  • Why science fiction matters so much, especially to oppressed and occupied people
  • The political significance of the immortals Weesagichak and Weetigo
  • How she made her stunning film Wakening,
  • And how on a budget of $100,000, she made it look like millions

WAKENING

INTERVIEW WITH DANIS GOULET ABOUT WAKENING

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Apr 11, 2018

I am a pernsnicketty cat—some would say difficult—and I have been known to argue at length that no one should ever use the expression “laughed out loud” because all laughter is out loud, by definition. So that means if I can overcome my boundless rage enough to invite the host of a national radio programme called Laugh Out Loud, I must really be impressed. And I am.

But Ali Hassan actually grabbed my attention not by MCing that showcase for Canadian comedians, but rather for his excellent work as an interviewer and guest host on CBC Radio’s q. I liked his voice, I liked his rapport with guests, and I liked his questions—but what totally floored me was that he easily and accurately dropped a reference to KRS-One during an interview without explaining it. I thought, I have got to contact this dude. So I did, and that’s what led to today’s conversation about the art, craft, and business of stand-up comedy and interviewing.

Hassan is a Pakistani-Canadian comedian, actor, and chef from Montreal. He’s toured Canada and performed at Just for Laughs and the Winnipeg Comedy Festival; he’s performed across the US and the Middle East, and took his one-man show Muslim, Interrupted to Scotland for the planet’s biggest comedy festival, the Edinburgh Fringe. He’s been in the movies Breakaway, French Immersion, and Goon!, and on TV he’s on Odd Squad, Man Seeking Woman, Game On, Cardinal, Designated Survivor, and FUBAR: Age of Computer.

Hassan spoke with me by Skype on February 2, 2018. We discussed:

  • How the ethics and personalities of stand-up are so different from those of improv comedy
  • The bizarre array of careers he attempted and what he learned from them that prepared him for comedy
  • How hosting Canada Reads was the ideal training ground to host CBC q
  • When a comedy MC should purposefully tank his own performance
  • How to teach inexperienced journalists the most important quality for their job, and
  • When you should leave interviewing permanently

 

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Mar 19, 2018

It’s been well over two thousand, three hundred years since an actual Egyptian sat on the throne of the Nile Valley’s greatest civilisation. Since then, only foreigners have controlled Kemet, the true name for Egypt. And yet control over Kemet remains a fierce battle to this day.

On the one side are Eurocentrists who, to build their racial self-esteem, and to justify the massive crime of imperialism against Africa, have spent the last three hundred years Whitewashing the civilisation into something that their own Greek and Roman ancestors never claimed.

On the other side is everyone who embraces the historical record, physical anthropology, comparative linguistics and culture, and, of course, DNA. They recognise what most of Hollywood, Arabs in Egypt, and the Western academic establishment refuse to: that Kemet was an African civilisation from its farmers to its pharaohs.

Previously on MF Galaxy I’ve had a range of guests discussing African Egypt, including Molefi Kete Asante, Martin Bernal, Richard Poe, and Runoko Rashidi. Today I’m delighted to add a new authority to the roster: Deidra Ramsey McIntyre. She’s a programmer, tech-writer, journalist, entrepreneur, and teacher. She’s been a cross-disciplinary writer on Kemet for years, bridging genetics, culture, and ancient documents to demonstrate the Africanity of the Nile Valley civilisation.

McIntyre is also the administrator of the Facebook group Africa: Ancient Kemet & Nubia connection group. She creates succinct infographics about Kemet’s Africanity, and writes at length about Kemet on Quora.

McIntyre spoke with me by Skype from her home on February 22, 2018. We discussed:

  • Why pop culture such as the massively successful Black Panther movie won’t be enough to stop the academy from Whitewashing Kemet
  • The major reason why so many Westerners cling to the belief that Ancient Egypt was non-African, despite the wide-ranging evidence that proves them wrong
  • The savage attacks that Eurocentrists mount against even White academics who simply discuss the facts
  • The Whitewashing of Tutankhamun by National Geographic, and which iconic sculpture from Ancient Kemet is actually a Eurocentric fake

Along the way, we discussed a range of topics, some of which don’t get explained in our conversation. So, a few notes:

  • The name Kemet means “the black land” as in its rich soil, but also, according to Black Athena author Martin Bernal in an interview with me from years ago, “land of Black people.” The name “Egypt” is an English rendering of Aigyptos, a Greek corruption of the ancient Kemetic name “Het-Ka-Ptah.”
  • Cheikh Anta Diop was a Senegalese nuclear physicist and Egyptologist, author of many works including the classic The African Origin of Civilisation: Myth Or Reality?
  • The White Crown is the name given to the gourd-like crown of southern Egypt
  • Zawi Hawass is an Arab Egyptologist and former Minister of State for Antiquities Affairs in the Arab Republic of Egypt
  • Finally, while discussing the cultural significance of Black Panther, I quoted what it had earned the day our discussion. As of March 18, 2018, the day I’m recording this episode, Black Panther had earned $1.18 billion globally.
  • The fictional Wakandan panther god Bast is the actual ancient feline goddess Bast, Baset, or Bastet from Ancient Kemet, and the Wakandan script seems mostly based on Tifinagh, an ancient Berber script spread over Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Libya, and Algeria.

Deidra Ramsey McIntyre’s Quora Articles on Kemet

Nefertiti bust a forgery

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Mar 15, 2018

Many Canadians, Indigenous and settler alike, were furious to learn the back-to-back verdicts in two murder cases. Juries declared Gerald Stanley not guilty of killing 22-year-old Colten Boushie, and Raymond Courmier not guilty of killing 14-year-old Tina Fontaine. The cases exposed how our colonial justice system makes it easy to exclude Indigenous citizens from juries and how rarely families can expect those who kill their loved ones to go to prison.

Some people protested in the streets. Some people protested with their art. Some people wept for the dead and for the future of their children. And some people did all three.

One such man is Rex Smallboy, the former leader of War Party, one of the country’s most successful hip hop bands ever. The motivational speaker and award-winning artist from Alberta’s Maskwacis Cree reserve released the song “Hey They Killing Us” immediately after the jury freed Tina Fontaine’s killer. You’ll hear it later in this show in which Smallboy discusses:

  • The level of anxiety he faces at the thought of his children simply going out of the house
  • The angry reactions some settlers, including a friend, gave him for discussing the racism that Indigenous Canadians experience daily
  • His fears that Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine will be forgotten
  • What he wants more than anything else
  • The one place in Canada he’s found where Indigenous and settler Canadians live together with respect and kindness, and what it’s going to take to fix the country

Rex Smallboy spoke with me by Skype on March 6, 2018. During our discussion he referred to Hobbema, the former settler name for the Maskwacis Cree reserve 70 km south of Edmonton.

 

Jury says Tina Fontaine’s killer can walk free

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Mar 5, 2018

Marvel’s Black Panther is a global sensation. As of Saturday, March 3, 2018, only two weeks and two days into its release, the Ryan Coogler/Joe Robert Cole film has grossed $US898 million worldwide. Within its first week it had outgrossed what DC’s Justice League took three months to earn, and the entire US runs of Ant-Man, Doctor Strange, The Incredible Hulk, the first Captain America, and the first two Thor films. It had the fifth-highest opening of all time and the third-highest four-day opening ever.

Of course, money isn’t everything, but the astonishing success of a film that is 100% obviously Africentric, starring African characters played by African actors, written by two African writers and directed by an African director, is game-changing. It negates in sky-writing every Hollywood executive who ever claimed that US-made movies about and by Africans could not make money outside the US.

And this is within the same 12-month period in which the African-made, Africentric film Get Out, shot on a budget of a paltry $4.5 million, earned a quarter of a billion dollars globally.

We’ve all seen the photos of African-Americans and African-Canadians wearing gorgeous African clothing to watch the premiere of the movie, and it’s clear that the film is inspiring generations of young and older global Africans the way that Star Wars inspired filmmakers and fans worldwide.

There are countless articles and podcasts and interviews about Black Panther, and some people have posted Wakanda curricula online—in fact, mine will be online at ministerfaust.com next week. And obviously the film has its detractors, too.

To discuss the film I asked a wide range of global African writers, filmmakers, academics, and political organisers to tell me their own experience of the film, its characters, its social significance, and its likely impact on Africentric filmmaking. On today’s episode of MF GALAXY, you’ll hear:

  • Zig Zag Claybourne, author of The Brothers Jetstream
  • Science fiction short story writer K. Ceres Wright,
  • DeWayne Copeland, co-creator and producer of the superhero web-series CV Nation
  • Founder and editor in chief of Black Girl Magic literary magazine Kenesha Williams
  • Buk Arop, president of the South Sudan Development Foundation
  • Science fiction novelist and horror filmmaker Jeff Carroll,
  • Greg Tate, musician, producer, culture commentator, and author of Everything But the Burden: What White People are Taking from Black Culture
  • Elysium author Jennifer Marie Brissett
  • Lateef Martin, founder and creative director of Miscellaneum Studios
  • The president of the Council of Canadians of African and Caribbean Heritage in Edmonton, Siyani Nsaliwa
  • Carole McDonnell, author of Wind Follower
  • Editor of Black and Brown Planets: The Politics of Race in Science Fiction, Isiah Lavender III
  • K. Tempest Bradford, science fiction author, media critic, and podcaster of Originality
  • Photographer, educator, and writer Jean-Sebastien Boncy
  • Culture commentator Robert Monroe, Jr., and
  • Poet, playwright, dramatist, and post-colonial theorist Mukonzki wa Musyoki

And for today’s episode, like last week’s show, I’m offering the bonus content for free. Find part 2 of today’s episode right now at patreon.com/mfgalaxy.

A reminder that this show is 100% spoilers.

Janelle Monae - “Django Jane”

Zacari + Babes Wodumo - “Redemption”

Ghanaian Architect David Adjaye

African-American Artist David Hammons

Ethiopian Artist Julie Mehretu

 

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Feb 21, 2018

Maybe you’ve been chained at the centre of the earth and the mole-people have been jamming your wifi since you got there, and that’s why you don’t know about the breathtaking Marvel blockbuster Black Panther. If so, I don’t know how you’re hearing this podcast, but my sympathies to you and I’ll try to lower a pitcher of lemonade on a long rope.

But for everyone else, as of February 21, not even a week after opening day, the $200M-budget movie has earned $441 million worldwide. The idea that a completely Africentric science fiction film with a pan-African cast, set in a fictional African country, with no major European stars, and written and directed by Africans, could achieve one of the biggest opening weeks ever was, even a few years ago, unthinkable. You could even say the idea of that success itself was Africentric science fiction. And now, it’s reality.

Ryan Coogler and Joe Robert Cole wrote it, Coogler directed it, and Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, and Letitia Wright among many others starred in it, and it’s outstanding. Story-wise, in many ways it’s an Africentric Star Wars but set on Earth. The film inspired massive anticipation, far more than I ever would have guessed, and many African movie goers attended wearing gorgeous continental clothing to celebrate and posted their photographs to prove it.

But with so many people expecting so much, including some people who know very little about superheroes and science fiction, it’s inevitable that many people expected this action movie to do things that action movies can’t and shouldn’t do: that is, provide a saintly portrait of perfect people behaving nicely and checking off every box on their personal, political, cultural, and artistic agenda. Lemme tell you: no movie ever will do that, unless it’s two hours of rock-hard dullness.

This is an action movie with a mind, Marvel’s most intellectual, most feminist, and clearly most African. So I sat down at the African Safari Somali restaurant in the neighbourhood of Kush, Edmonton on February 18, 2018, with a group of brilliant and accomplished friends of mine: YA author Natasha Deen, arts organiser Darren Jordan, HIV activist Morenike Olaosebikan, Black Women United co-founder Junetta Jamerson, and Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta David Shepherd, to discuss the movie and its social significance. And let me be clear, our discussion is 100% spoilers.

Today and next week, as a special gift in honour of African History Month, I’m releasing the extended versions of this show absolutely free. Just go to Patreon.com/mfgalaxy to download more than 40 minutes of extended content, no charge. Of course, if you want to support MF GALAXY, please become a sponsor and access all the other bonus content.

A correction—I refer to the Great Djenne Mosque of Mali as being in Timbuktu, but that was silly of me, because of course the Great Djenne Mosque is in, where else, Djenne. Timbuktu is a separate city.

15 Black Panther Easter Eggs Only True Fans Caught

Rolling Stone: The Black Panther Revolution

Ryan Coogler and Michael B. Jordan hope to make film about Malian King Mansa Musa – the richest man in history

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Feb 18, 2018

Continuing our programming for Black Panther Month ahead of the local and international review panels for the Marvel blockbuster, we’re delving deeper into historical African martial arts, or HAMA. If you loved the exciting, aspirational vision of a fictional African technostate with its own fighting arts, MF Galaxy is your show to learn about actual combat systems from the continent.

Yes, you know about East Asian martial arts such as Chinese kung fu, Korean tae kwon do, and Japanese judo, but what about Sudanese Nuba wrestling? Or stickfighting from Ancient Egypt called Tahtib or from Zululand called Nguni? Or Madagascari boxing called moraingy?

To discuss those forms and more, I spoke with Mansa Myrie. Originally from Red Deer, Alberta, Myrie is the Chief Operations Officer of the Historical African Martial Arts Association, a new and international organisation whose aim is to promote verifiable information about and practice of historical African fighting arts and warfare.

Myrie spoke with me from his home in Hamilton, Ontario by Skype on January 17, 2018. We discussed:

  • The defining features of HAMA systems such as Ghana’s dambe, Madagascar’s moraingy, and Egyptian tahtib
  • The similarities between the Senegalese wrestling system of Laamb and Nuba wrestling from Sudan and South Sudan
  • The three core arts of Ancient Egyptian warfare and which of them you can start to learn today, and
  • How and why Myrie began researching historical African martial arts, and why he’s so focused on separating myth from reality

Along the way, he mentions “the Hamitic hypothesis” and the Hyksos. The Hamitic hypothesis was a 19th century European myth that survives to this day—a European racial esteem fantasy to claim that a range of African civilisations including Ancient Egypt were actually European. The Hyksos, or more properly known by their Ancient Egyptian name Heka Khasut, were non-African invaders from the west and east who at times dominated the country.

Historical African Martial Arts Association

HAMAA YouTube Channel

HAMAA Facebook

Moraingy (Madascar)

Moraingy - Research

Da’Mon Stith

Da’Mon Stith’s reading list for HAMA

Dr. Adel Boulad, founder of Modern Tahtib

Dr. Adel Boulad video

Bor Wrestling Association of Canada

Nguni stick fighting

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Feb 14, 2018

This is Black Panther Month on MF GALAXY and with all the excitement surging about the Marvel movie about the Wakanda super-genius, superhero, super-fighter, the time is right to go beyond fictional African martials arts and discover authentic, deadly African martial arts from across the continent and across history.

Most people in the West think of the phrase “martial arts” as referring to East Asian fighting systems such as kung fu, karate, and tae kwon do, without realising that “martial arts” means any combat system. And certainly every culture in the world produced its own combat systems or its people would have been assimilated or annihilated.

So it really should not be a surprise that the African continent, home to humanity and birthplace of civilisation, should have scores of martials arts, ranging from the wrestling, sword systems, and stick fighting of Ancient Egypt, to the range of West African fighting arts, and that’s where we begin today.

Balogun Ojetade is a fascinating man with a remarkable history. The African-American playwright, filmmaker, and Steamfunk novelist is also a master of martials arts from Yoruba civilisation, an area covering Togo, Benin, and part of Nigeria. He runs the international African Martial Arts Institute whose headquarters are in Atlanta.

The school features a trio of West African systems he groups under the name Egbe Ogun, and seeks to promote African histories and cultures though demonstrations, lectures, workshops, classes, films, plays, and music. Egbe Ogun is a formidable system, and its experts are more than capable of meeting fighters from any other art head-on.

On January 18, 2018 Balogun Ojetade spoke with me by Skype from his home in Atlanta. We discussed:

  • His own remarkable origin story of being introduced to West African martial arts
  • The body movement that is at the core of all martial arts whether its practitioners know it or not
  • Why students can and should be taught to fight with knives as soon as possible
  • How his educational approach differs from the typical mode of East Asian fighting schools, and
  • How Egbe Ogun fits into the Africentric culture of Atlanta, despite how the public school system in that city attempts to stop students from identifying with their West African heritage

To hear nearly half-an-hour of patrons-only bonus content from our conversation, visit mfgalaxy.org to click on the Patreon link to become a sponsor for a dollar or more per week.

By funding MF GALAXY, you get access to all extended editions of the show including this one with West African martial arts master Balogun Ojetade discussing:

  • What any martial artist who wants to survive needs to know about martial arts uniforms
  • The only way to know if a martial artist is actually effective
  • The degree to which the community embraces his work, and
  • What Ojetade did when a Brazilian jujitsu fighter barged into the Afrikan Martial Arts Institute and challenged him in front of all his students

The African Martial Arts Institute

facebook.com/Afrikan.Martial.Arts

Twitter @Baba_Balogun

Tumblr.com/blog/blackspeculativefiction

The Yoruba martial art of Gidigbo

7 African Martial Arts You Probably Didn’t Know Existed

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Jan 31, 2018

What were the weapons in the arsenal of a man who survived a vicious racial dictatorship to emerge as an international ambassador for his people and his craft?

In the case of Hugh Masekela, who returned to the ancestors on January 23, 2018, the answer is two-part: a gramophone, and a Louis Armstrong trumpet.

Born outside Johannesburg in 1939, Masekela began playing music at age three--by way of winding his grandmother's gramophone and singing along. In his career, his own music would fuse South African mbaqanga, bebop, funk, and Nigerian Afrobeat. His prolific six decades of making music took him around the world and granted him the personal victories of playing with such titans Abdullah Ibrahim, Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Zensi Miriam Makeba, and Fela Anikulapo Kuti. His single “Grazing in the Grass” in the early 1970s topped the Rolling Stones’ “Jumping Jack Flash” on the US charts.

Humble and down-to-earth, yet deeply intelligent with a sweeping international perspective on art, politics, economics, and justice, Masekela was difficult to put in a single category. He didn’t even call himself a jazz musician.

After the Neo-Nazi apartheid regime banned his music, Masekela was forced to live in exile. He compared the effects of Apartheid to the effects of the European Holocaust against West and Central Africa, in that each operated by “making people lose their identity—that’s why families were broken up, so people lose their roots and self-esteem…. But it’s very difficult to take away in-grown culture from a person. It has failed throughout the ages.”

As if living in exile and the domestic banning of his music weren’t enough repression, his 1969 album Masekela was returned by a North American distributor “because they felt it was too radical.” But that didn’t make him hesitate to work with and befriend other radical artists and activists, including the late, brilliant Nigerian co-founder of Afrobeat, Fela Anikulapo Kuti. He eventually toured internationally with Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Zensi Miriam Makeba, and Ray Phiri, was featured in the 2003 documentary Amandla!, released the autobiography Still Grazing, and remained active in humanitarian causes such as the Lunchbox Fund which serves meals to students at Soweto schools.

I was privileged to interview Hugh Masekela by telephone in September, 2000 before he performed in Edmonton, and meet him when he arrived. If you go to MFGalaxy.org and click today’s show notes, you’ll find a playlist of Hugh Masekela songs and videos that speak for themselves or accompany parts of our conversation.

 

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Jan 24, 2018

Ron Pederson. I never worked with him but we crossed paths a bunch of times in Edmonton’s sketch comedy, improv, and theatre community, and then one day I up and turn on my TV and boom! There he is on MadTV, which for me was the funniest US sketch show ever made.

I shouldn’t’ve been so surprised he’d hit the big time. Other Edmontonians had made it big, including Michael J. Fox, Jill Hennessy from Law & Order, Bruce McCulloch from Kids in the Hall, and Nathan Fillion from Firefly. And Edmonton was and is English-speaking Canada’s leading theatre and sketch-improv city.

Still, to see a kid I knew on MadTV was exciting, and Ron was great. Plus I’d seen him kill in the gonzo science fiction musical comedy Road to Uranus by Dana Anderson and Cathleen Rootsaert. And he’d been a mainstay in the longform improv community with shows such as Die-Nasty!, and worked all across Canada with major outfits such as the Citadel in Edmonton, the Stratford Festival, the Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre, Tarragon, and more. So why not MadTV, huh?

But after three seasons, Ron left MadTV, and for plenty of people, by which I mean me, that raised the question, “What the hell? After you get on a show like freaking MadTV, why would you ever leave?”

Well, I decided to ask him.

In today’s MF GALAXY, Ron Pederson discusses:

  • How he started in the Edmonton theatre and improv communities, and which local luminary gave him his life-altering first big break
  • How improv is invaluable for performing artists and for plain-old being alive
  • The gonzo experiment of performing in an improv competition between two teams… completely by himself as both teams and the judge
  • Why acting onstage is so much more satisfying than acting onscreen, and
  • What he loved about working on what he calls one of the greatest sketch shows ever produced, and why he left it forever

We spoke by Skype on November 11, 2014.

To hear the nearly half an hour of patrons-only bonus content from my conversation with Ron Pederson, visit mfgalaxy.org to click on the Patreon link to become a sponsor for a dollar or more per week.

By funding MF GALAXY, you get access to all extended editions of the show including this one with Ron Pederson discussing:

  • His performance at the Edmonton International Fringe Festival of the science fiction musical comedy Road to Uranus with writers Cathleen Rootsaert and Dana Anderson
  • The mindset required to earn a living as a stage actor
  • How he got cast the audition for MadTV and how he nailed it
  • What it takes to survive and thrive on a sketch comedy TV series, and the surprising reason why he left it all behind

 

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Jan 12, 2018

Hey, MF GALAXY crew! Minister Faust here. Why not add your voice to the MF GALAXY podcast and the MF GALAXY blog?

That’s what listener and patron Jeff Quest did when I asked for opinions on the women of Star Wars, the Last Jedi. Jeff Quest is the blogger at SpyWrite.com and spybrary.com. In the following, he talks about how Rey is not only the new Luke Skywalker—she’s actually the better one.

Jan 11, 2018

Star Wars, The Last Jedi has got people talking about its exciting characters and battles and how iconic characters achieve their glory or meet their end. And for the first time there are plenty of female speaking roles in a Star Wars film: Rey, Rose and Paige Tico, Vice Admiral Holdo, Maz Kanata, Captain Phasma, and of course Princess Leia.

Some people claim, though, that reactions to the film are split along gender lines—that men hate it and women love it, because it’s the first Star Wars film to ask and answer the question, “What happens when men don’t listen to women?”

Well, obviously there are women who hate the film and men who love it (me included), but rather than argue about love-hate gender percentages that no one has actually measured, why not just ask some remarkable women what they thought about the female characters, their personalities and deeds, and whether the film does them justice?

So I did. On today’s MF GALAXY you’ll hear from Lisa Yaszek, science fiction scholar at Georgia Tech; Sylvia Douglas, a lead organiser of Lady Geeks Unite in Edmonton, and SG Wong, speculative crime novelist and community organiser, also from Edmonton.

Together, they’ll cover:

  • Who the most-short-changed character since Boba Fett is
  • What it means to say that Star Wars suffers from the “Highlander Syndrome”
  • What fashion has always revealed about the morality of Star Wars characters, and what it means to them
  • And the disturbing significance in the age of Trump of who excuses lethal mutiny, and why, and who has already paid the price

Sylvia Douglas + Lady Geeks Unite

twitter.com/lgnyeg

Lady Geeks of #YEG – How feminist fans empower women + girls + upgrade fandom

 

SG Wong

sgwong.com

SG Wong on world building + going indie when publisher does nothing

Cooking the Books: NaloHopkinson, Ekaterina Sedia + SG Wong on food, cyborgs+feminism

 

Lisa Yazek

pwp.gatech.edu/lyaszek (copy and paste this link into your browser)

Lisa Yaszek and Patrick Sharp on Sisters of Tomorrow: The true story of SF women pioneers + the men who fought them

 

Jeff Quest

spywrite.com

spybrary.com/tag/jeff-quest

 

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Dec 30, 2017

I don’t need much of an intro to today’s topic. We’re talking Star Wars: Episode Eight – The Last Jedi. JJ Abrams and his writer-flunkies are out for this one, but they’ll be back for number nine. This time the writer-director is Rian Johnson. Or is it Reean? Or Ree-Anne? Who knows. He’s done acclaimed work including Brick, The Brothers Bloom, Looper, and three episodes of Breaking Bad including its third last episode “Ozymandias.” In other words, buddy knows a thing or two about storytelling.

But how well can he do Star Wars? To help answer that question I’m joined today by two old friends: Stephen Notley, video game designer and the creator of Bob the Angry Flower, and Fish Griwkowsky, arts journalist and filmmaker. We’re all lifelong fans of Star Wars and we met three days after the opening of the film, December 17, 2017 at Edmonton’s Route 99 Diner to hash out The Last Jedi. And yes, today’s discussion is 100% SPOILERS. Listen at your own risk.

In today’s episode of MF GALAXY, we discuss:

  • How the film inevitably creates its own meta-movie, since we all know that Carrie Fisher is dead and that Princess Leia can’t come back
  • In what ways The Last Jedi is worse or better than The Force Awakens
  • The film’s theme that the only hope for the future is to let go of the past, or destroy it—and the cost of doing either
  • The ways The Last Jedi changes our understanding of classic Star Wars characters and events, and adds to its universe, and
  • The tragedy of Luke Skywalker

You can hear the full-length discussion, a bonus 40 minutes, for free! Just go to patreon.com/mfgalaxy. You’ll get to hear us yammer endlessly about:

  • The awesomely destructive death toll from Poe refusing to listen to women
  • The best destruction scene in Star Wars, ever
  • Porgs!
  • The chemistry of the actors and the characters—is it an improvement over The Force Awakens?
  • The sad fates of R2D2 and Luke Skywalker
  • How Snoke compares as a villain to Ian McDiarmid’s Palpatine
  • Where the hell is Lando Calrissian, and…
  • The power of smaller stakes and the true awakening of the Force

 

THE WOMEN OF THE LAST JEDI – BE PART OF THE DISCUSSION ON MF GALAXY!

Coming up next episode, join science fiction scholar Lisa Yaszek, Lady Geek Nite convener Sylvia Douglass, and science fiction novelists Jennifer Marie Brissett and Natasha Deen! We’re looking exclusively at the women of The Last Jedi: Rey, Rose, Vice Admiral Holdo, Maz Kanata, Captain Phasma, Paige Tico, and of course Princess Leia! Want to include your voice in MF GALAXY? Entries must be in by Friday, January 5, 2018!

WHAT TO DO:

Give me your opinion about any of the female characters from The Last Jedi: who they are, what they do, and how well the script and direction treat them. You can comment on any aspect you like, just one character, any combination or comparison, or all of them.

HOW TO DO IT:

If you choose to contribute, please record your answers into your phone or other audio device as a decent mp3 (preferably 192 kbps or higher, but if you don't know what that means, don't worry about it) and send it to me by Dropbox using mfgalaxypodcast at gmail dot com.

PLEASE REMEMBER to introduce yourself by saying, "I'm (your name). I (describe yourself). I want to talk about women characters in The Last Jedi because...." (and then answer whatever questions above you want, or your own ideas).

DON’T READ A SCRIPT, but feel free to use notes. Sounding unrehearsed is key. Rambling is just fine. Go as "inside baseball" as you like. Anything under 4 minutes.

I can’t guarantee your entry will make it onto the podcast, but I’ll listen to everything and include the most original answers that have broadcast quality sound.

Happy recording!

WHEN TO SEND IT:

Entries must arrive by Friday night, January 5, 2017. 

Dec 18, 2017

If you watch movies or TV shows such as Rambo or The Punisher and everything in between, you’ve probably seen how Hollywood explores PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder. According to US entertainment, PTSD is the horror that former soldiers experience because of war: flashbacks and rage attacks triggered by cars backfiring and footfalls at night.

But what if I told you that most of what you’ve been told about PTSD is wrong? That the causes are far more common and complex, and they’re in homes and on streets across the world? That “classic” symptoms such as flashbacks are extremely rare? That the US military is spending a gigantic fortune to cure PTSD, but not for humanitarian reasons? And that the only real cure to PTSD is probably prevention?

To discuss these questions today, let’s hear from Cultural and American Studies scholar Kali Tal, who spoke with me by Skype from her home in Bern, Switzerland on December 8, 2017. With combined interests including historiography, cultural anthropology, and African American studies, Tal has spent decades researching the complex causes of PTSD and our dire need to stop traumatising people in the first place. She’s a qualitative researcher and scientific editor at the University of Bern, and the author of Worlds of Hurt: Reading the Literatures of Trauma. And if you’d like to read it for free, keep listening.

In today’s episode of MF GALAXY, we discuss:

  • Why feminists pushed for a PTSD diagnosis for years before the psychological establishment accepted it, and why it didn’t work as they’d hoped
  • Why PTSD is so widespread that in some places, the question should be “Who doesn’t have PTSD?”
  • The class, gender, and cultural biases built into the PTSD establishment
  • The disturbing reasons why the US military and drug corporations are so interested in a cure, and the quack therapies being peddled as effective
  • And why working with other people is your best shot to relieve PTSD and fight its global causes

kalital.com

worldsofhurt.com

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Dec 11, 2017

Okay, so you’re a writer and you write a book and if you’re lucky it sells more than ten thousand copies, but you probably sold far less than that and then you’re looking through a bookstore and you find books written by Betty White, Robe Lowe, Patton Oswald, Miley Cyrus, Mindy Kaling #$%#@&!! Justin Bieber, who probably can’t even read? And you get furious and think how the deck is totally stacked against you, because how can you compete against someone whose book publicity machine is the entire music industry or Hollywood?

And then you get smart and say, “How can I get a cut of that action?”

And the good news is, you don’t have to be famous to do it.

Enter author and now agent Nick Chiles. He’s been in the writing game for more than three decades—not only as the editor-in-chief of Atlanta Blackstar, but as a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and multiple award-winning education reporter, and now as a best-selling author and celebrity co-writer. Chiles has co-created books with singer Bobby Brown, with political organiser Al Sharpton, with former Governor of Massachusetts Deval Patrick, and with NBA star Etan Thomas, among others.

So the lesson to all struggling writers is clear: you’re not famous, but you could write with someone who is, get paid, and get to attach the title “best-selling author” to your name for the rest of your career. 

Nick Chiles spoke with me on November 6, 2017 by Skype from his office in Atlanta. We discussed: 

  • How to convince celebrities to face and disclose their unflattering history, and the disturbing truth he got Bobby Brown to admit
  • What Al Sharpton forced him to answer while they were working on Sharpton’s book
  • Why one celebrity co-writer can cause more personal growth than an entourage of a hundred, and
  • How celebrities are likely to view a co-author who forces them to face reality

 

nickchiles.com

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Dec 5, 2017

I don’t know if there’s anything like Jordan Peele’s blockbuster horror film Get Out. Oh, there have been low-budget Africentric horror movies before, and this one was definitely low-budget: it cost only $4.5 million when the average Hollywood film is around $80 million.

But Get Out has earned a quarter of a billion dollars around the world, which further puts the lie to the Hollywood claim that audiences in Europe won’t watch films starring African casts or featuring Africentric stories. Plus, Get Out is an extremely political film.

I don’t mean it’s partisan, though: the villains in the film would seem at home at any US Democratic Party fundraiser or power-play. I mean it’s political, in that it’s an unforgettable and horrific satire on US Whitesupremacy. The film and its ideas are so powerful that its central metaphor “The Sunken Place” has entered our culture and vocabulary.

And for all those reasons and more, horror writer and UCLA film studies instructor Tananarive Due knew she had to teach a course built around Peele’s film. She called it “The Sunken Place: Racism, Survival, and Black Horror Aesthetic.”

Due worked as a journalist for many years, and is also the author of many celebrated novels, including The Living Blood, Devil’s Wake, and Joplin’s Ghost, and the short story collection Ghost Summer. She also co-wrote Freedom in the Family, a memoir of the 1960s US human rights struggle from the perspective of her mother, Patricia Stephens Due, who’d been an activist in it.

With her novelist husband Steven Barnes, Due writes the Tennyson Hardwick mystery series in partnership with actor Blair Underwood. She holds a journalism degree and an M.A. in English literature from Leeds, where she specialized in Nigerian literature as a Rotary Foundation Scholar.

Due has won the American Book Award, an NAACP Image Award, and the Kindred Award. In 2004, along with Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, Due received the “New Voice in Literature Award” at the Yari Yari Pamberi conference co-sponsored by New York University's Institute of African-American Affairs and African Studies Program and the Organization of Women Writers of Africa.

Tananarive Due spoke with me by Skype on November 20, 2017 from her home in California. We discussed:

  • The amazing story of how a Jordan Peele practical joke became the best film studies guest lecture ever
  • Why Tananarive Due’s UCLA film course The Sunken Place has become her most popular course ever
  • How the metaphor of the Sunken Place has entered our culture and its various dimensions of meaning
  • What the film says about who appears innocent while being completely complicit
  • African women in Get Out—are they more heroic than they first appear? And
  • The controversial Golden Globes categorization of the film as a comedy

Of course today’s discussion is 100% spoilerific, so if you haven’t watched Get Out yet, pause the podcast, watch the film, and come back to listen.

tananarivedue.com

Watch Jordan Peele confirm and debunk some of the most popular theories about hidden themes in 'Get Out'

 

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Nov 30, 2017

By the end of Malcolm X’s second trip to Africa and the Middle East in 1964, he said at a press conference, “In every country you go to, usually the degree of progress can never be separated from the woman. If you’re in a country that’s progressive, the woman is progressive. If you’re in a country that reflects the consciousness toward the importance of education, it’s because the woman is aware of the importance of education.

“But in every backward country you’ll find the women are backward, and in every country where education is not stressed it’s because the women don’t have education.

“So one of the things I became thoroughly convinced of in my recent travels is the importance of giving freedom to the women, giving her education, and giving her the incentive to get out there and put the same spirit and understanding in her children. And I am frankly proud of the contributions that our women have made in the struggle for freedom and I’m one person who’s for giving them all the leeway possible because they’ve made a greater contribution than many of us men.”

Malcolm X made that statement in 1964 following diplomatic missions to African and Arab countries, including to Tanzania. How is Tanzania doing today?

On June 22, 2017 Tanzanian President John Pombe Magufuli declared that all public schools must expel any girls who are pregnant. He offered this hopeful advice for post-delivery education, though: “they can learn sewing but they cannot go back to school.”

This is the same country in which men can legally marry girls as young as 14 and yet there is no sex education in schools. To have your own government steal your educational future, of course, is not just a tragic loss for any individual and her own children to build a life of their own making. But multiply that theft times thousands of people, and you fundamentally degrade your country’s path towards technological, economic, political, and social innovation and growth.

So who’s fighting this man-made disaster in Tanzania?

Enter Petrider Paul, who describes herself as “a Proud Feminist advocating to end of gender-based violence.” She’s a co-founder of Youth for Change Tanzania, a global partnership to end early forced marriage and female genital mutilation.

She’s worked with numerous organisations including Youth for Change, UNICEF, the United Nations Population Fund, and the Centre for Foreign Relations Tanzania. She’s launched an international petition campaign calling on the Tanzanian government to stop blocking sex education and stop expelling pregnant girls.

On November 22, 2017, Petrider Paul spoke with me by Skype from her home in Tanzania. We discussed:

  • The imbalance in punishment between the girls and the boys and men who impregnated them
  • What NGOs are doing about the absence of sex education in Tanzanian schools
  • The Tanzanian government’s propaganda campaign aimed at and against girls
  • The concerns of her peers and family about her safety while protesting a government that has jailed an opposition MP for speaking against this misogynist anti-education policy.

 

Nov 23, 2017

Unless you’re absolutely clueless, you know that self-declared Nazis, fascists, Whitesupremacists, and other extremists using a huge range of names, are on the march. Their goal is a race war. They have weapons. They have training. They’re in police forces and militaries. They have media services in Canada, the US, Russia, and elsewhere. They’ve elected their confederates across the world. And their number one ally occupies the White House. Underestimate them at the peril of the planet.

So how do you fight them? And who’s had success doing it?

Today’s guest is a fascinating figure. He’s a former US Air Force man who's spent a lifetime fighting American neo-nazis and was a pioneer of the early internet with innovative online tactics to fight Whitesupremacists. Today, in service of his cause he speaks across the United States. Liberal and conservative journalists try to smear him; Nazis try to fight him in the courts and lose.

Why do they fear him? Because he doxxes them. That is, he exposes the Nazis who are hiding in plain sight by investigating them and revealing their nazi identity to the world. But he also helps those people who want to leave the nazi movement. He fearlessly steps up to fascists such as Richard Spencer and Matthew Heimbach and simply mocks them, and even got Spencer thrown out of CPAC, the Conservative Political Affairs Conference which was teeming with Spencer's own fanatics.

That is, he exposes the Nazis who are hiding in plain sight by investigating them and revealing their nazi identity to the world. But he also helps those people who want to leave the nazi movement. He fearlessly steps up to fascists such as Richard Spencer and Matthew Heimbach and simply mocks them, and even got Spencer thrown out of CPAC, the Conservative Political Affairs Conference which was teeming with Spencer's own fanatics.

And all this is a 6'4" brother who loves punk music. He's Daryle Lamont Jenkins, one of the founders of the antifascist organisation One People’s Project. And man, does he have great stories to tell.

We spoke by Skype on November 1 and November 8, 2017 while he was on a speaking tour. We discussed:

  • Whether the US fascist movement is the most dangerous it’s been in our lifetime
  • How the US fascists have gotten this far
  • The surprising new generation of fascists that includes coloured people who want to be White
  • Why fascists cannot be allowed to break up the United States and create their own ethnostate homelands
  • What Third Positionism is and why it’s a threat
  • How he got started in antifascism and what you can learn from his success

 

Daryle Lamont Jenkins on Richard Collins III & Rising Alt-Right Terror

Antifa Heroes or Villains? Exclusive With Daryle Lamont Jenkins

Daryle Lamont Jenkins on Richard Collins III & Rising Alt-Right Terror

BTR News: How Should The Black Community View The Antifa Movement w/ Daryle Lamont Jenkins (BTR News)

Racism and the Right in the U.S.: a conversation with Daryle Lamont Jenkins

Final Straw: Daryle Lamont Jenkins (Final Straw)

Episode 12: Doxxing, Propaganda, and Liberals with Daryle Lamont Jenkins (Friendly Anarchism)

This Man Is Kicking White Supremacists’ Ass and Literally Taking Names

Meet Daryle Lamont Jenkins, Insatiable Doxxer of Fascists and Nazis

Norman Lear, producer of Good Times, say Jimmy Walker and Ann Coulter are actually dating

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Nov 15, 2017

Stranger Things, Season One, is the Netflix hit series that revels in 80s nostalgia and pays homage to everything from ET and The Goonies to Firestarter and Dungeons & Dragons.

It’s the story of four small-town American boys, Will, Mike, Dustin, and Lucas, who encounter a mysterious girl named Eleven who possesses enormous power that threatens to destroy anyone who crosses her—even agents of the United States government. And all of them and the people they love are threatened by Lovecraftian annihilation from a force emanating from a place beyond reckoning: the Upside Down. 

I love Stranger Things, and not just because I’m a child of 80s. I love it because it does what I tried to do with my debut novel The Coyote Kings: celebrate friendship and young love and science fiction and fantasy fandom and the heroism of young people. The series is enamoured with its non-glamourous setting and the innocence of its characters, chief of which are teenagers played by actual teenagers, harkening to the glory days of DeGrassi Junior High, rather than having gangly 13-year-olds played by 25 year-old athletes and underwear models.

The series loves the American science fiction and fantasy movies, TV shows, and games of my youth, and does them one better—tying them into a coherent package that rises above 99% of its inspiration. The show makes me feel like a kid again in the best possible ways.

And now season 2 is out, and tonight’s SPOILER-INTENSE CONVERSATION features my guest and friend, the acclaimed science fiction novelist who’s also a scientist, Ekaterina Sedia. She’s the author of five novels including the celebrated Heart of Iron. She’s been on MF GALAXY before to talk food, fiction, and feminism, and she’s also maybe just as much a fan of Stranger Things as I am, if that’s actually possible.

Today, we discuss:

  • How Stranger Things 2 depicts discovering personal power, personal tactics, the power of the group, and the power of rage
  • Whether the punk episode is the most hated of series and if it deserves to be
  • If Steve is mother of the year, or brother of the year
  • The anti-feminist danger of learning how to be human from All My Children
  • The danger of being Barb or Bob
  • Why standing up to Nazis or Lovecraftian evil by yourself is not the best strategy
  • What the Hopper-El relationship says about trauma, well-intentioned but terrible parenting, and leaping from prisons of exploitation to prisons of misguided love, and
  • Joyce’s relationship with the most BASIC character of all

 

ekaterinasedia.com

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